Disability Discrimination: Cerebral Palsy Stories in Competitive Employment

Disability discrimination is the central theme for this series of seven transformation stories about my struggle as a person with cerebral palsy (CP) to compete in the mainstream workplace.

Download Little Book 5 about disability-at-work Issues now.

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Transformation stories about disability at work

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Here's why you need to read this eBook of transformation stories. It shows what worked for me as I encountered some tough disability-at-work issues. In this quick read (about 50 minutes), you get:

  • Expert advice
  • Potential pathways
  • Mainstream orientation

Now is the time to help your new job finder with CP prepare for likely disability-at-work issues he or she will likely encounter once on the job.

The steps you take now will help your youngster find meaningful work and build an enjoyable life.


Seven stories for mentoring your new job finder

 Below are seven personal-experience stories (and seven learning experiences) about my own experiences in learning how to effectively handle seven key disability-at-work issues.

During the 1960s, I didn’t have an opportunity to tell my mom about those experiences.

They are transformation stories which now, decades later, may help you mentor your own youngster.

Story 1 - “Playing the Pauper” 

Story 2 – “Hot Type, Cold Reality”Detours”

Story 3 – “The Back Door into Adulthood”

Story 4 – “On Getting It Right” 

Story 5 – “A Jump Start for Both of Us”

Story 6 – “Bungled Bluff” 

Story 7 – “The Neighbor I Never Met”


Little Books of transformation stories: Get all 7

There are actually seven quick career-insight Little Books for parents of youngsters with CP

Each of the seven Little Books takes about 40 minutes to read.

Each illustrates and summarizes the essential career builders for your youngster’s age group – all through seven transformation stories about my personal experience as a person with CP.

Get all seven Little Books.

Excerpt from story 1

PLAYING THE PAUPER
It's too easy to fall into playing the “victim” and fulfilling the expectations of others due to your disability.

Here's one time when I found myself in that trap.

"I've got 84 cents," I sheepishly told the fellow in a Hardee's shirt behind the counter. "What can I buy for that?" It was 2:30 in the afternoon. My stomach felt hollow. I needed some cholesterol and caffeine to keep me going.

His name badge read, "Ned," and it hung crooked from the pocket of his shirt, which was too big for his slender frame. He glanced awkwardly at my crutches, turned around and looked at the menu overhead.  It was 1993 – before Hardee’s began to accept credit cards.

"Well, there's the 59-cent cheeseburger," he said in a squeaky voice. "And, that's about all...."

Garish menu boards always seem confusing to me. "What's a carton of white milk?"

"49 cents."

Milk is expensive, I thought.

"How about a small Coke?" I mumbled, thinking that would be cheaper.

"59 cents."

Maybe milk is not such a bad deal. "Just give me the cheeseburger," I finally said, satisfied that it would get me through the afternoon.

"What does he want?" I overheard Gert quietly ask Ned as she suddenly appeared behind the counter. She wore thick bifocals and a brown and orange cap over her gray hair.

Rebecca Wilberg's LinkedIn entry recommending my eBooks.

Download Little Book 5 now.

Return from Disability Discrimination to Job Finder

Go to Cerebral Palsy Career Builders

This is Creative Commons content.  You can freely and legally use, share and repurpose it for non-commercial purposes only, provided you attach this sentence and the following attribution to it (including the two links):

Originally written and illustrated by Jim Hasse, ABC, GCDF, owner of Hasse Communication Counseling, LLC, who, as a person with cerebral palsy, served for 10 years as a vice president in a Fortune 500 company during his 29-year career in corporate communication. He’s an Accredited Business Communicator, certified as a Global Career Development Facilitator and author of 14 Amazon books about disability awareness and disability employment issues.

Break Out: Finding Freedom When You Don’t Quite Fit the Mold” is a modern memoir of Jim Hasse’s 51 personal-experience stories as a person with a disability about what it means to be “too different” in a society with a penchant for conformity and tribalism.

Break Out was first published in 1996, but Jim's collection of 51 true stories are even more relevant today (in the light of our current political and cultural climate) than it was back then.

Take a look at this section of his 1996 Preface to the book:

"In a divided world and country, extremist views, quick answers and homogenized insights often get the press coverage and broadcast time. 'Maybe' and 'I don't know yet" take too much time and are too tentative. They garner little credibility in much of the media.

"Yet, on a personal level, most of us live with a larger reality. A part of our journey through life is settling for temporary "maybe" answers about who we are and who we can become. That's especially true when we need to face fundamental questions about how we can deal effectively with false assumptions about ourselves (and the presumptions others may form about us) because we don't quite fit accepted norms." 

Only two copies of this paperback are available on Amazon. Or, pick up your FREE copy (one of 192 remaining copies from the first printing) at Disability Pride Madison on July 27.

Jim writes:

“I now look at Break Out  as a treasure-trove for those who specialize in narrative therapy within the disability community.

"After 20 years of publishing Break Out, I have revisited each of these stories and published a series of eBooks that include the original stories but add my after-thoughts about what each episode really meant in my struggle with vulnerability.

"For those of us with disabilities, this  new series of 'updates' provides examples  of how to shape our life stories for greater well-being."